alberta accident report

Car accidents in Alberta happen daily. But do you know what to do next? Many drivers are unsure. Are you supposed to call the police? How do you fill out an Alberta accident report?

These are the questions many drivers in Alberta are asking. Do you know how to report an accident? If not, or if you are unclear about the details, we have you covered.

This blog post provides you with all the information you need to know about how to report car accidents in Alberta.

In Alberta, a collision qualifies to be a car accident, and this happens when your vehicle comes into contact with an object on a highway, a pedestrian, another vehicle or even a bicycle.

No, you are not. However, certain instances oblige you to report a car accident, and they are:

 

  • When there are casualties. When there are none, including damages, then you don’t have to report the accident.
  • When the damage costs exceed $2,000. You don’t have to report the accident if the damage costs are $2,000 or less.
  • Special cases like an after-crime hit-and-run or one that happens due to the influence of drugs and substance or intoxicants. A report is not necessary in an otherwise case where no crime has been committed.

Follow these steps:

  1. Call 911 if the accident has resulted in serious injuries, loss of life or if a crime was committed by the driver who caused the accident, say for example they were intoxicated.
  2. A police report is mandatory if:
  • Either or both of the vehicles involved in the accident are not drivable.
  • Either or both drivers do not have documentation, i.e., insurance papers or a valid driver’s license.
  • The driver who caused the accident is intoxicated or shows signs of the same.
  1. A police report which doesn’t require the police at the scene of the accident should be filed at a local police station when there are injuries sustained, whether major or minor and when the damages costs are above $2,000.

You need the following:

  • Vehicles’ information, i.e., a valid insurance, registration, and license plates.
  • Drivers’ information, i.e., name and drivers’ license, license number or both.

The following are Canada car accident stats for 2017:

  • 5.0 recorded fatalities in every 100,000 people.
  • 9,960 recorded serious injuries.
  • 1,841 recorded fatalities.

In 1998, there were 2583 recorded fatal collisions, and by 2003, the number had dropped to 2,487. In 2008, there were 2,193 recorded fatal collisions, in 2013, the number further dropped to 1,772, and in 2017, there were 1,679.

Alberta collision stats for 2016

  • 299 recorded traffic fatalities.
  • 16,622 recorded injuries, both serious and minor.
  • 133,124 recorded collisions.

Fatal collision stats

  • 16.3% of drivers were found to have been intoxicated
  • 34.2% of pedestrians were found to have been intoxicated
  • A higher number of fatal collisions was recorded in rural areas than in urban areas.

Age and gender casualty report

  • A higher number of casualties was recorded with individuals between 15 and 24 years old.
  • The highest rate of casualty involvement was recorded with 18 to 19 years old male drivers.

Period and time casualty report

  • Afternoons had the highest number of collisions recorded.
  • Friday had the highest number of collisions recorded.
  • May had the highest number of recorded fatal collisions.
  • June had the highest number of recorded injury collisions.

Do the following:

  1. Remain at the accident scene.
  2. Check for casualties if any.
  3. Seek help if there are any casualties.
  4. Call 911 if there are any serious injuries if there are damage costs exceeding $2,000 and or if the driver who caused the accident is found to have been intoxicated prior to the accident.
  5. Exchange details with the other driver. This includes the vehicle’s information and yours too.
  6. You can then move your vehicle(s) from the scene.
  7. Give us a call, and we shall be at the scene as soon as possible then we’ll guide you on what to do next. Meanwhile, you can collect some important information like witness contacts, record the conditions that lead to the accident and even take photographic evidence if possible.

A police report is mandatory if:

  • Either or both of the vehicles involved in the accident are not drivable.
  • Either or both drivers do not have documentation, i.e., insurance papers or a valid driver’s license.
  • The driver who caused the accident is intoxicated or shows signs of the same.

 

A police report which doesn’t require the police at the scene of the accident should be filed at a local police station when there are injuries sustained, whether major or minor and when the damages costs are above $2,000.

 

To file a collision report, you’ll be provided with an A-file for the stated purpose.

Do not:

  1. Leave the accident scene.
  2. Move your vehicles before you exchange details with the other driver.
  3. Accept any offers which may include settling damages on the scene or outside, accepting blame, ignoring facts about the accident or money for any intentions otherwise.
  4. Sign documents provided by the other driver or any other individual including the police, unless the document is a police report.
  5. Repair your vehicle. Your insurance company should clear it for repair and give references to facilities for the purpose of the same.

Car accidents

You should always report car accidents to the police if the damage costs incurred is more than $2,000 and either or both vehicles involved are not drivable. In these circumstances, you’re required to file a police report within 24 hrs. However, when there are casualties of serious injuries or deaths, then you’re required to call the police instantly.

Hit and run accidents

It is illegal to leave the accident scene. Therefore, a driver who hits you and takes off is liable to criminal charges. So, how do you report these accidents?

 

Take down important information about the car that’ll help in tracking down the driver. These include:

  • The vehicle’s plate number
  • The vehicle’s model
  • The vehicle’s make
  • Any other description(s) of the vehicle that you can remember
  • A description, as clear as possible, about the driver
  • A direction of where the vehicle might have headed

Parking lot accidents

Parking lot accidents happen a lot, and most people don’t usually know what to do afterwards. If the driver of the vehicle is still there at the scene, then the steps to follow in a road accident will apply. However, if the driver left without leaving a note, then they’ll be considered to have fled, and therefore the accident can be regarded as a hit and run, and the steps to follow will be the same.

An accident report will not affect your insurance claim directly, because the report shall not be used in the valuation of your compensation. However, a valid police accident report can play a role in the investigation of a car accident and finding out who’s to blame.